Tuesday, February 15, 2011

GE Ecomagination, and Two Giveaways of a FIFTY DOLLAR Light Bulb of Awesomeness!

This is sponsored content from BlogHer and GE.



Here are some changes we've made at our house that haven't made any difference:

1. Stopped using fabric softener, except with a particular blanket that is otherwise a mass of painful, sparky static.

2. Reduced the amount of laundry detergent we were using by about a third.

3. Set the wash time for most loads from 10 minutes down to 8 minutes.

4. Stopped using the "pre-wash" compartment for dishwasher detergent.


No noticeable change in results. And this is exactly the kind of environmental change I like to make: a change that DOESN'T BOTHER ME AT ALL. (And in all these cases, also happens to save us money.) Better yet are the changes we've made out of a feeling of environmental responsibility but then ended up LIKING BETTER:

1. Switched to cloth napkins. (They're so pleasant on the hands! They don't tear into little shreds! They feel gratifyingly like wiping our hands our on clothes! They're fun to choose!)

2. Switched to cloth, er, feminine products. (They're so soft and comfy! They're available in fun fabrics!)

3. Switched to handkerchiefs. (They're so soft and comfy! They irritate our noses less! They keep stuff off our hands so much better!)

4. Switched to reusable grocery bags. (They hold so much more! They don't tip over in the car! The handles are comfy and don't cut into our hands!)


I talk about these things on my blog sometimes, and in fact I've done giveaways to try to persuade other people to try them too, to see if THEY like them. But the thing is, we do these things because we PREFER them and we like them BETTER---so if someone else DOESN'T prefer them and DOESN'T like them better, you're not going to catch me trying to push them or guilt them into it. They should find the environmental changes THEY prefer. We're not ALL going to do EVERYTHING---so it makes sense that we'd all choose our own most-appealing assortment. Some of us will use cloth diapers but think cloth feminine products are gross; some of us will be the opposite; some of us will use neither but will be faithful composters, or have a hybrid car, or take shorter showers, or switch to cloth napkins.

Pretty, pretty cloth napkins.


I talk about this with the kids, too: there are some things you should do whether you like it or not (that empty can is going into the recycling and you're not going to complain about having to walk the extra two steps; turn the water off when you're done using it), but there are other areas where we can actively seek out the things we don't mind doing---or at least mind doing LESS. I think it's important, with a subject as big as Environmental Improvement, not to get overwhelmed and discouraged by the vastness of the task. It's tempting to think, "I don't even compost---isn't it kind of lame/hypocritical to turn down the heat?" NO. No it is NOT. Which is better for the environment: not-composting and keeping the heat at 72 degrees? or not-composting and keeping the heat at 68 degrees? Dang straight: it's better to do something than nothing.

And when you do something, you might find it leads you to do the next thing. When we started recycling paper, we found it more appealing to turn the thermostat down; when we turned the thermostat down, we found it more appealing to reduce the minutes the washing machine ran; when that worked out fine, we found it more appealing to try reducing the detergent too. It starts to feel almost like a game, instead of a painful sacrifice---and making changes gradually help them not to be too overwhelming.

Or to turn the subject to light bulbs since that's the giveaway, it's overwhelming to think of going out and buying twenty expensive fluorescent light bulbs to replace all the bulbs in the house, but it's easy to buy just one to replace the next bulb that burns out. And then maybe the bulbs go on sale and it's not too hard to buy a few more. And pretty soon the job is done, with much less pain, and now you're used to the price of the bulbs and you barely even flinch anymore.

In this case, the prize is for something I'd consider VERY PAINFUL to have to purchase: a FIFTY-DOLLAR light bulb. It's an LED bulb that lasts TWENTY YEARS and saves about $85 in energy costs over its lifetime. Comments will be taken for two weeks, and there will be one bulb given away each week. So not only can you make an easy change that might inspire you to make further changes, you DON'T EVEN HAVE TO PAY FOR IT. (Or replace it for twenty years!)

GE is doing this giveaway to draw attention to their Ecomagination Challenge, which is a massive idea-hunt for clever new ways to make good environmental changes (saving, managing, and even creating energy) at the household level---not the tip-sharing we all do, but, like, genius new ideas no one's thought of before. Yes, YES, I think we all know that the biggest, highest-impact changes could be made by corporations and factories---but as with the "not-composting plus thermostat-lowering," small changes ADD THE HECK UP, and our choices affect corporations. Furthermore, our changes get us in a frame of mind to feel invested in pushing for bigger change at a bigger level. AND, when we make these changes, we bring up our children to do these things automatically: I had to learn how to sort recycling and use a handkerchief, but my kids have grown up with it as the norm. AND-and, if people come up with some really genius ideas, perhaps those ideas will have even more impact even at the household level than the usual household-level changes do---and perhaps they could ALSO be used by corporations and factories.


To enter the light bulb giveaway, leave a comment on this post by February 28, 2011 about some of the energy-use challenges in your household, or some of the environmental stuff you find easy or pleasing to do. (To enter the GE Ecomagination challenge, see below after the light bulb giveaway rules.)

Rules: Contest is open to U.S. residents age 18 or older. No duplicate comments. Winner will be selected by random drawing, and I have to hear back from the winner within 72 hours or else I have to select a new winner. You may receive up to 2 total entries by selecting from the following entry methods:
  1. Leave a comment in response to the sweepstakes prompt on this post
  2. Tweet about this promotion and leave the URL to that tweet in a comment on this post
  3. Blog about this promotion and leave the URL to that post in a comment on this post
  4. For those with no Twitter or blog, read the official rules to learn about an alternate form of entry.
For more details, visit the Official Rules. To read what other bloggers had to say on this topic (and to enter THEIR light bulb giveaways), visit the blogger round-up page.

For more information on GE and their Ecomagination Challenge, and/or to submit a genius new idea, visit their site and their Facebook page and their blog.

95 comments:

Nowheymama said...

It's fun to think about where to put the lightbulb. I would put it in our porch light, which is a pain in the buttocks to change. Won't have to do it again for twenty years! Woot!

Amanda said...

I did exactly as you said and bought one energy efficient bulb as each non-energy-efficient bulb burned out. It's been a couple of years now and I haven't purchased a single replacement for any of the energy-efficient ones. I can't remember the last time I bought a light bulb, or thought about light bulbs. I'm really glad I went about it the way I did.

We also try to use mostly cloth napkins. For some reason the kids figure if they're going to use cloth, it might as well be their clothes so that was no the hit I thought it was going to be, but they ARE pretty.

Susan said...

We do the same thing, where we make small changes all along. We used cloth diapers (love them!), we've migrated to energy efficient bulbs, and we compost. I try to remember to bring the cloth bags to the grocery store, as we have a million and I love them, but my biggest problem is just forgetting to bring them. So we end up with a million plastic bags alongside our million cloth bags.

Sally said...

We have all our computers and our tv plugged into power strips that we turn off when we're not using them. It also keeps little fingers from being able to turn them on without permission, which means I would do it even if it didn't save energy.

Becs said...

I'm gradually getting better about using reusable grocery bags - I love them, but they're usually full of stuff and so not available for groceries ... Also nerdily excited about the reusable produce bags I received for Christmas :)

Annika said...

TWENTY YEARS? Can't talk, brain exploding.

Mimi said...

A $50 lightbulb? I had no idea there was such a thing. Now I want one. =)

Misty said...

We compost and recycle. Doing this means we have one measly tiny bag of garbage for the garbage truck every week. I think that is really fun.

Christy said...

Man, twenty years sounds nice. Get this - my husband is so cheap (wait for it - "how cheap IS he?") since we are not planning on staying in this house for maybe 2 more years, he wants us to TAKE THE BULBS WITH US WHEN WE MOVE. I figure we leave them in the little house and spin it as some form of mini-upgrade. What good will it really do the environment if we just take them with us and put more cheapy incandescent lights back in commission??

Other than the lights, we recycle religiously, have the programmable thermostat, and I cannot remember the last time I washed clothes with anything but cold water. My husband uses hankies and we use dishrags/washcloths for cleaning. Our paper towel usage went from astronomical to like, one roll every 3 weeks.

I wish I could compost, but alas, no room for the composter and nowhere to actually, you know, USE the compost.

Tara said...

Cloth diapers. No diaper rash! Pretty colors!

Our washer has a "tap cold" setting that saves a LOT of energy. We use that setting for everything except the first diaper soak/wash and every other week's towels and sheets loads.

We turn off our computers every day. Seems obvious, but we, my husband especially, lives on the computer and it wastes a lot of energy! Also, we unplug pretty much everything we can, and leave lights off most of the day.

Mary said...

I have only energy efficient lightbulbs and I switched to family cloth, which I know seems gross, but it's really not. I live alone so I think it's easier to do on my own, plus I have saved a ton of money on toilet paper. The 4 pack I bought in October is still going strong. I also only use cloth towels in my kitchen and cloth napkins. No paper or disposable anything really.

SallyG said...

Our town started recycling at the first of the year and I find very simple and pleasing to do. We keep a small basket right in the kitchen and toss in all cans, paper (OMG the paper that comes home from school! I go through the backpacks right in front of the recycling basket every day), cardboard, plastics, etc. It cuts WAY down on our trash (which is gratifying to see) and now it all fits in the bin and doesn't end up all over the neighborhood every week. WINWINWIN!

LiciaLee said...

I've never been very energy efficient/ecofriendly til lately. And now I'm just going crazy. In the last 6 months I've started cloth diapering, using cloth napkins, reusable grocery bags, recycling, and when I start my cycle again I plan to use cloth pads. CRAZY. LOL. I would love a 50 dollar light bulb. WOW. :D.

d e v a n said...

I love this post. It's so easy to start with one little thing at a time. We do recycle, compost, reusable feminine products, cloth napkins and towels some of the time, and we also wash in cold water, shorter cycles and less detergent. (I've been amazed how little you can actually use and still get clean clothes!)
darrendevan at gmail dot com

Leanne said...

We have a bucket in the shower to catch cold water while the shower is heating up. That goes and waters our fruit trees that aren't on a drip system. We also have chickens that act as our composting system. They eat just about everything and their poop makes good compost. Plus, we get fresh eggs every day (we only have 3, which gives us more than enough eggs).

pamk said...

I use CFL’s in most of my lamps. I turn on the dishwasher when I go to bed, to run it when power costs are lower. I cover up with an electric throw in the evenings and use an electric blanket on my bed, so I can lower the temp in the rest of the house. In the summer, I use a floor fan and ceiling fans to supplement the central air system. I’d love to try this new LED bulb!

Julie said...

I've been really working on making sure things are turned off - or even better, unplugged - when not in use. It's something my dad always told us kids, and now I'm the parent handing it down. I also line dry (OK, set out around the kitchen overnight to dry) most of the kids' clothes, which saves on electricity and keeps me from inadvertently shrinking them.

robinbpME said...

We try to throw less away. For us that means recycling what we can, composting, cloth napkins, cleaning rags (haven't bough paper towels since October!), pads and diapers. I also try to be mindful of the packaging my food is in, but we save so much money buying produce at the wholesale club, and it all comes in plastic clamshells, which aren't recycleable in our town, so ... ??? We're mindful of the electric and heating bills, too, so we installed a programmable thermostat this year (awesome!) and we're good about turning off things when we're not using them.

Carolyn said...

I have found reusable bags doubly useful when grocery shopping on a shoestring budget. Some of our super-discount grocery stores (Aldis, Save-A-Lot) charge for grocery bags (defeating the discounts you may have saved in food at times), so I bring my own bags to save money and the environment.

Jen in MI said...

We recycle, have a programmable thermostat, and use cloth bags faithfully at the grocery store. We are planning to compost starting this summer. One of our friends goes to a school where they do Terracycle, so we save lots of other things for them. We are also migrating to energy efficient bulbs.

mmburdette22 said...

To reduce my use of plastic (and save money) I wash out and reuse my ziploc baggies (until they get too gross, of course).

Anonymous said...

I wash clothes in cold water. I usually hang clothes to dry and the kids help by turning lights off when not being used.

MCantu1019@aol.com

Frondly said...

We were already using cloth grocery bags, but when we ALSO found reusable PRODUCE bags I felt downright virtuous. I love them!

One thing I sometimes wonder about is the plastic garbage pail liner situation. Wouldn't it be better to use compost bags, even if the trash bags are going in the trash? I mean, isn't it better to be sending biodegradable stuff to the dump? Why aren't there more biodegradable trash bags marketed as such?

Dmarie said...

It is a kind of a game to see how much I can do to reduce using electricity or gas or one-time-use products! We have an HE washer and unless the laundry is really dirty, I sometimes use only 1 tablespoon of liquid detergent. I've read that some things don't even need to be washed with ANY soap, so I'll be keeping my eyes open for those types of loads. Always washing full loads, washing in cold and hang-drying are other environmentally responsible things that I feel good about doing.

Kelly Massman said...

We turn down the heat at night in winter! Thanks!
kmassmanATgmailDOTcom

Amy said...

You really have some lovely cloth napkins! What a great idea. I can't wait to go do some shopping now! :D

Amy
http://utry.it

missris said...

We keep everything on power strips and turn them off when not in use. Our electricity bills are amazingly low.

jen(melty) said...

I'd love to try one and hope the price comes down soon! I have gone the cf route and I'm embarrassed to say I cannot stand them and their green light and the fact they take so long to warm up that we leave them on all the time anyway.

But in other ways we've used cloth napkins, we've repurposed some old work shirts to make cloth napkins, even! I already use the lowest amt of detergent on my clothes and have done so since the days of cloth diapering. And I always wash on cold/cold and full loads only. I never use fabric softener anyway. I never let the water run. If it's reusable, I try to see if I can fit it in my life. Our house is already frigid in winter! I am starting to keep power strips that I can turn on and off as needed and not have anything plugged in. I shop around my house for things instead of buying if possible. I sound like my parents, asking nobody in particular why all the lights are on in this house, hehe.

Anonymous said...

We wash our clothes with cold water. Then we hang them to let them dry

duckstrawberry@aol.com

Rah said...

Plugged all my home office hardware cords onto a serge protector that has an on/off switch, so I can turn them all absolutely off when I'm not working there. That way they don't sit around 24/7 "sleeping" and sucking up energy. Cloth napkins for 5 years now; reusable grocery bags for at least 10 years; am slowly converting my light bulbs to more eco-friendly ones (in the manner you suggested); cut WAY back on detergent (read the instructions--few loads actually NEED a whole capful); some loads I just wash 2 minutes (e.g., to get the chlorine out of my swimsuit); turn my furnace way down at night and bundle up in blankets.

Melody said...

I have also found that once I started doing little environmental things here and there, I found myself more inclined to look for new things I could do.

Speaking of laundry detergent, there is a neat business in my town where I can buy environmentally friendly laundry detergent in a re-usable container. When I run out, I take the container back and they fill it back up for me! My big change in my life has been the change in my diet. I only eat meat a few times a month.

It would be great to have this light bulb, to help me make another easy change!

CAQuincy said...

We've been a cold water/full load/minimal detergient family for quite a while now. I use cloths for most of my household cleaning. I am intrigued by the idea of cloth napkins AND cloth feminine products--perhaps it's time to invest in them? I've been bringing my own grocery bags for a few years now (if only the HUSBAND would remember--every time he goes to the store we end up with a ga-gillion plastic bags). Most of our light bulbs have been converted over to energy-efficient ones now--but none of them can last 20 years!

Jenni said...

We do several little things like wash and reuse ziplock bags (buy freezer quality so they last), cloth napkins (when no one has a cold), etc, and two big things: we have only one car and walk when possible: kids to school, into town for errands...and we buy all our meat and eggs from local farms, and spring through fall all our produce, too. Have been gradually switching lightbulbs and would love the $50 one!

Jeanette said...

A 20 year light bulb appeals equally to my lazy side and my environmentally concerned side. :)

Dr. Maureen said...

We use mostly CFLs (except for when I can't stand the glare), cloth diapers, and cloth napkins. I recently started washing everything in cold. This one is new. Every time I think we're doing really well, I realize there's something else to do! Also, we're going to insulate our attic and recaulk all the windows this spring because the wind is WHISTLING through window sills this winter! (temporary fix: painter's tape. Unattractive, but at least it stems the whistling.)

clhsd said...

I am trying so hard this year to do more recycling and more focus on energy savings. I do a lot of the standard things around the house like keeping lights off, using power strips and keeping appliances unplugged when not in use, lowering the thermostat, etc. This product sounds amazing!

Dala said...

We recycle. We also used cloth diapers but are finished with those now (two babies, 15 months apart). We use cloth napkins and tissues. All of those are easy choices because we actually prefer the cloth over paper. I hate it when I'm behind on laundry and have to use a paper towel instead of a cloth napkin. Ours are terry though instead of cotton and I love the terry. Ours are also smaller. Kind of sized like a cloth wipe. I like the smaller size. Oh, and another eco friendly option for that time of the month is the menstrual cup. If you can get over the ick factor and the learning curve, they are wonderful (and seriously, after giving birth is there really an ick factor any more?). You'll never go back.

We use a lot of CFLs and I'd love the chance to check out this new kind of bulb. Exciting giveaway!

L said...

I started drinking tap water - in part so I can feel smug about the environmental benefits, but also because I figure it saves us $2 a week in bottled water and we don't have empty bottles as much so we don't have to take out the trash as often and our apartment isn't littered with empty water bottles. AND my experience has been that refrigerated tap water is just as good as refrigerated bottled water.

ccr in MA said...

I recycle a lot, including paper and cardboard, and it kind of bugs me that no one else in my building is doing it. I'm getting better about remembering to bring shopping bags with me. And most of the laundry on cold. Nothing new, but every little bit helps.

shala_darkstone said...

Hi, we use a programmable thermostat and timers on our lights to save energy. We also put in new energy efficient patio doors recently.
maddiemb {at} comcast (dot) net

shala_darkstone said...

Here's my tweet - http://twitter.com/#!/shala_darkstone/status/39310429654220800
maddiemb {at} comcast (dot) net

Emily said...

Our home isn't well insulated.

Omaha Mama said...

We've taken baby steps to being more green. Reusable grocery bags, recycling, shutting off lights, and pressing the $ button on our thermostat when we leave the house (it changes the temp 5 degrees). I am mindful of waste and act accordingly, which is green and frugal. :-)

ky2here said...

Our eyes have stayed open after visiting Barcelona and seeing all the energy efficient measures. We (America) are so far behind. Let's do our part to catch up.

ky2here said...

Here's my tweet: http://twitter.com/#!/ky2here1/status/39505044520837121

ky2here at msn dot com

Anonymous said...

Cold water wash/rinse and unplugging all lights, etc when we're not using them. It has helped
michaeldkolb@aol.com

Rebecca Graham said...

We are unplugging our cell phone charger cords and all other recharger cords when not in use.

rhoneygtn at yahoo dot com

MOMFOREVERANDEVER said...

here is one most will not like but seriously saves alot of water and electricity...wash the dishes by hand-it not only gets down right away but is good talk time if with someone else, good alone tie- good arm exercise but with me I love the fact it is clean- use a tom less water and do not have to harp on unloading- noticed a huge savings on water and electricity snce we ran it everyday

DawnA said...

We have been slowly replacing regular bulbs w/ eco. Certainly not 20 year bulbs (due to the cost) but a step in the right direction. I LOVE my reusable shopping bags. The bags at the store have gotten much smaller and less sturdy. Reusable bags are the way to go.
dawniawnie (a) aol (dot) com

Sandy said...

This is a great post! I love seeing other people's ideas, it makes this whole green thing seem more doable. We use reusable grocery bags (I always keep one in my purse just in case I stop at the market last minute), and we're really good about recycling our bottles and cans. I try to wash most of our clothes in cold water. I know there are a lot of other changes we could be making - baby steps!

Courtney said...

We do the same thing. We replace one when one goes out. It's easier and cost-friendly to do it that way!

hebert024 at aol dot com

Anonymous said...

Weather and laundry backlog permitting, I hang things on a clothesline to dry. It's one of the 'green' things I would probably do even if it didn't save energy. The laundry smells of fresh air, and things seem to look & feel new longer. (Towels and jeans get a quick run in the dryer when they are about 95% dry so they don't feel cardboardy.) Win-win.

coliebear said...

I use reusable grocery sacks at the store to be more environmentally friendly.
lenz.nicole(at)gmail(dot)com

miriama said...

We have reusable shopping bags, recycle, use CFL bulbs.

clc408 said...

I'm an avid recycler and I only have about 1 bag of trash per month. I also use a water filter pitcher instead of bottled water.

clc408 said...

Tweet:
http://twitter.com/clc408/status/40012858032922624

Janice said...

Biggest challenge is getting everyone to recycle

M&Co. said...

I like that my kid's school recycles aluminum as a fund raiser. It makes me feel good about recycling.

Erica David said...

I've had solar panels on my roof for 10 years -- I bought my system but now you can lease panels for zero-down from sungevity.com. Big electricity savings! Also, your school can raise money through the sungevity.org Beyond the Bake Sale solar fundraising program.

sweetsue said...

We lowered the temperature on our hot water heater a few degrees. We also have afghans on the sofas and chairs and keep the heat low.
smchester at gmail dot com

Derk Thomas said...

I like recycling and reducing the trash that gets thrown out.

Kelsey said...

We use mostly reusable shopping bags and have made some other small changes - slowly changing over the light bulbs, being more militant about recycling, unplugging phone chargers...

One area we are BAD at is paper products - I am trying to cut down on using paper towels for spills, but I have a hard time remembering.

sksweeps said...

I got solar panels years ago when the tax rebates were great and have been thrilled! I no longer have to cringe everytime the power company raises it's rates! We are still super conservative about using power (air dry clothes, lower temps in winter, less AC in summer, turn things off...), but it's a nice feeling to not have to stress! I'm also doing a lot in my garden - fruit trees and veggies and then preserving for later (talk about eating local and healthy). And, my latest project is rainwater harvesting! I have big cisterns that the water goes into (out of gutter on roof) and I then use that water for my garden! Win, win!

sksweeps (at) earthlink (dot) net

Dave Stephenson said...

finally bit the bullet and had insulation blown into our sidewalls--with the gas company rebates only paid $300 out of over $1,000 price!

elizabeth p said...

We use cloth napkins and we live in a state with a bottle deposit so recycling is easier for us. The kids love to count up the nickels for each bottle. I am queenesperfect at yahoo.com

nape said...

I unplug appliances, use curly lightbulbs, keep the thermostat low, use a heat pump, recycle and repurpose. But it wasn’t until I found a window leaking cold air that I was able to lower our out-of-control heating bill. I covered it in plastic, and the bill dropped dramatically. I’m still amazed at how much money and energy that sheet of plastic saved us.

Thanks for a great giveaway!

nape said...

Tweeted you!
http://twitter.com/Ida_Sessions/status/40870855651246080

grandmap said...

Just replaced the old toilet with a water saving one!

s8r8l33 said...

My family composts in the summer and we recycle everthing we can. We also grow a garden in the summer and let all of our used water in the house water our garden and lawn.
s8r8l33 at yahoo dot com

s8r8l33 said...

tweeted
http://twitter.com/#!/s8r8l33/status/41353022315569152

ferriz said...

our house is surrounded by trees so it stays dark all day, requiring the use of lights... or risk tripping over things and falling to our deaths. it sucks. :(

ferriza2(at)yahoo(dot)com

Ardy22 said...

One of our bigges challenges is overuse of hot water. We reduced the temperature to help a bit

ardy22 at earthlink dot net

Ardy22 said...

tweet

http://twitter.com/#!/Ardy22/status/41837631235043328

ardy22 at earthlink dot net

Erica C. said...

Recycling bottles is one of the easiest to me...especially soda bottles since I use the caps for reward points anyway.

Deb said...

We have installed faucet aerators and low-flow shower heads to cut water heating costs, but the biggest problems is that all of the members of my family REALLY love taking long showers. We occasionally indulge now, but most of the time we limit our time in the shower.

Kitty Cardero said...

I find it really easy to wash almost all of our laundry in cold water. I always feel good because I know I'm doing a small thing that adds up.

Kitty Cardero said...

Tweeted http://twitter.com/#!/kittycardero/status/42014631325204480

Tammy said...

We need new windows.

RhymeSchemesAndDaydreams said...

Using CFL bulbs, recycling, and making sure lights and TV are off when we leave the room are easy and make a big difference in our electric bill, as well as being better choices for the Earth.

Elka said...

Energy challenges would be making my son stop using so much water and keeping lights on and the air that drafts thru the windows
electricisland(at)gmail.com

Suzannah said...

We recycle, use our reusable shopping bags, use flourescent light bulbs, wash in cold water, have programmable thermostats, and all that. We also recently needed to replace our HVAC unit and got some super efficient system that is saving a good bit of energy and money a month. Against my wishes, we also keep our house COLD (I think) - 62 when we're not home, 65 when we are home. We try to build a fire when we can to heat the home more. Looking forward to spring and the end of pollen season when I can line dry our clothes again.

clynsg said...

I have been recycling for years now, and it is more difficult here than when I started. There is no pickup of recyclables here, and the collection site only accepts certain things--for example, steel cans would require driving to the only site for them, which would be a 150 mile round trip. Would rather defeat the purpose. As to light bulbs, about the only ones I have not yet switched to CFL bulbs as yet are the few that haven't required changing as yet, and considering that they are all high, hard to reach ceiling lights, they will require some help from my grandson when they do go.

cgclynsg0 @ gmail dot com

Deborah Wellenstein said...

We recycle everything we can, we use reusable grocery bags (I have a couple of Chicobags in my purse, and we switched most of our light bulbs to the curllicue kind 4 years ago-I have had only one burn out so far. Thanks!

dwellenstein at cox dot net

Leslie said...

We are getting a fireplace insert so we can diversify out heating costs, and cut down on them. Heating with wood is not only renewable, but also cheaper!

I tweeted on this as well, but am not sure how to link to the specific tweet...

twitter.com/spillingbuckets

saly said...

We recycle and we compost. We keep the heat WAY down even though I am always cold.

Denise S. said...

My biggest challenge is air seeping through the windows and doors that are too thin or not sealed well enough.

lazybones344 at gmail dot com

angie lilly said...

Even though we are extremely conservative in our energy usage (all lights are CFLs, turn lights off in all rooms not being used, keep thermostat set to 65 in the winter, etc.), our power bill is still over $100 this month. I would love to see how this new light bulb helps. I can't wait until the price comes down!
Angie
14earth at gmail dot com

Chisum Crew said...

Winter was rough this year and our electric bills have been insane. I'd love to get that bill WAY lower. trinitygsd at yahoo dot com

angie lilly said...

I tweeted here:
http://twitter.com/#!/FotoMacro/status/42327372434911232
Angie
14earth at gmail dot com

js22 said...

keeping house costs to a minimum is important when one is unemployed.
I turn the thermostat down to save on fuel & $$! And I turn it lower when we are not home.
Thanks for the giveaway!
email in blogger profile.

js22 said...

tweet: http://twitter.com/js22222222/status/42331788718260224
email in blogger profile.

Scott said...

Shut off lights when you leave a room, use daylight rather than turning on lights at all when possible, wash all your laundry in cold water when possible , line dry your clothing when possible, set your thermostat high in the summer and low in the winter,
use energy efficient appliances and light bulbs, unplug things that are not in use, etc. We do all of these things and wish the whole planet did! Our power bill is still high to me, but to other people its insanely low. I wish I could afford solar panels for my roof!
Scott
nynekats at gmail dot com

Scott said...

tweet
http://twitter.com/#!/RePurrPussed/status/42332624395579392
Scott
nynekats at gmail dot com

Barbarawr said...

My biggest energy challenge is my husband. He is the only one in the house who still believes he's going to go back to the room where he left the TV and lights on in under an hour.

I do all the things the electric company suggests except that I can NOT time my baking to coincide with dinner so I only have to heat the oven once.
Email address is in blogger profile

Barbarawr said...

I tweeted http://twitter.com/bsw529/status/42383382172270592

Email address is in blogger profile